About Ainsley's Angels Education

At Ainsley's Angels of America, education focuses on inclusion, awareness, and celebration of differences.  We aim to foster the use of people first language, as we know and understand that a diagnosis never defines an individual.  We also recognize that diagnostic labels and medical terminology can be confusing and overwhelming. This page will aim to clarify some of those terms.  We also strive to break down any preconceived barriers that exist related to individuals with physical limitations or different abilities and aim to include ALL people. 

Email us at Education@AinsleysAngels.org

Education Resources

Below are some valuable resources to help you to be an Angel and educate, celebrate and promote inclusion in your every day lives! 

People First Language

Remember, a disability description or term is only a medical diagnosis.  It does not define the person with the diagnosis.  "People first language" respectfully places the PERSON before the descriptive term and also focuses on a disability as a small component of the whole person.  Similarly to having brown hair, or blue eyes, a child may have a diagnosis such as cerebral palsy or Down Syndrome but it is not their only or most important characteristic.

For example, we encourage the statement "people with disabilities" as opposed to "the handicapped or disabled" or "she has autism" instead of  "She is autistic".

This type of language encourages inclusion, equality and respect.  Join us in making our words matter!

 

For more examples or information about people first language visit:

https://www.thearc.org/who-we-are/media-center/people-first-language

https://www.inclusionproject.org/lets-all-play/people-first-language/

What is a disability?
Problem versus Need
Basic Medical Terms
Motivational and Inspirtational Speeches

Major Kim Rossiter (Rooster), Founder and President of Ainsley's Angels of America

and

Dr. Shaun Evans, PT, Vice President of Education Ainsley's Angels of America

We offer inspiring messages about overcoming obstacles, finding a "new normal", and dreaming BIG in spite of adversity and challenge.

Our messages have motivated, inspired, and moved audiences at universities, professional conferences, businesses, schools, churches, community groups and more across the nation, and can be tailored to suit your requests.

Contact us at Education@ainsleysangels.org to inquire.

Literary Works

Education Blog- Educate to Empower

A weekly blog to offer insight, reflection and guidance for education, advocacy, and celebration of inclusion.

#1 Awkward interactions

Those of us that are close with individuals with disabilities, or that use equipment to get around, know all too well that interactions with new people can often be awkward. Upon meeting Shamus in his wheelchair, some people speak to him as if he were hard of hearing (in reality, he can hear my wife Nichole and I whispering from 100 yards away with traffic rumbling by on our busy road), some people will speak to him as if he were an infant or toddler (he is nearly 13, gets straight A’s and is headed to middle school this fall where he qualified to take accelerated classes), some people will simply hold their gaze on Shamus and his chair for an extra several seconds. While none of these interactions are ideal, there is an even worse interaction that we occasionally encounter. Those are the people who talk about Shamus as if he isn’t there at all, uttering phrases such as “So what is wrong with him?” or “What is his issue?” or “What’s his problem?” We often handle those encounters by first….taking a deep breath….and recognize that this is an opportunity to educate others, with a reply like “Shamus uses a wheelchair because he was born with cerebral palsy….we don’t look at it as a problem, it’s just a small part of who he is. He understands everything you say. He can hear every word you say.   He is a bright young man who does well in school. Just a few of his many activities include rolling, sailing, and skiing with the wind…He is has completed several triathlons, and running/rolling events from 1 mile to transcontinental journeys….not to mention he plays piano and baritone horn, and has a great singing voice….all you need to do is listen J”   Shay simply smiles that infectious smile and then answers follow up questions about some of the things he does…Like when someone raises an eyebrow and says “Transcontinental???” He nonchalantly replies “Yeah, in 2015 our family ran from Seattle to NYC for Ainsley’s Angels giving chairs to other kids that want to roll like my dad and me”. As the questioner stands there, often with mouth agape, we have the opportunity to hand them an Ainsley’s Angels wristband and say with a smile “Website is on the inside”.

#2 Start with a smile
#3 Watch your language
#4 People First
#5 Disability Awareness
# 6- Be the positive
#7 Accessibility
#8 Empathy
#9- Empathy continued
#10 Inclusion
#11 Inclusion continued
#12 More inclusion
#13 Illness versus Ability
#14 Caregivers
#15- Caregiver Balance
#16- Caregiver Emotions
#17- Grateful
#18- Strength
#19- ADA
#20- Seize the day
#21- Joy
#22- Goals
#23- Happy New Year
#24- Consistency
#25- Visualization
Motivational and Inspirtational Speeches

Major Kim Rossiter (Rooster), Founder and President of Ainsley's Angels of America

and

Dr. Shaun Evans, PT, Vice President of Education Ainsley's Angels of America

We offer inspiring messages about overcoming obstacles, finding a "new normal", and dreaming BIG in spite of adversity and challenge.

Our messages have motivated, inspired, and moved audiences at universities, professional conferences, businesses, schools, churches, community groups and more across the nation, and can be tailored to suit your requests.

Contact us at Education@ainsleysangels.org to inquire.

Literary Works